What is Serrapeptase & What are the Health Benefits of Serrapeptase?

I first found out about serrapeptase when I went to a chiropractor about herniated discs in my neck. My injury was caused by an accident 25 years ago, but it’s only now that I started having a problem. My chiropractor recommended I take serrapeptase as a supplement to help break scar tissue. In addition the serrapeptase he recommended contained MSM and trace minerals which he said would help strengthen the discs to prevent future herniation. My response to my chiropractor was “What is Serrapeptase?”.

I’ve been taking serrapeptase now for around three months. I need to take it on and empty stomach. The serrapeptase tablets that I take have an enteric coating so that the enzyme is not denatured by the acid in the stomach that passes through into the small intestines where absorption can occur through the intestinal walls and the serrapeptase ends up in the blood where it can do its job.

Since I was taking serrapeptase, I decided to do a little bit more research into it.

Frequently Asked Questions

Serrapeptase

What is Serrapeptase?

Serrapeptase is a naturally occurring enzyme that was originally isolated from silk worm larvae. The enzyme is produced by bacteria in the gut of silk worm, and is responsible for helping the silk worm digest the mulberry leaf (its natural food) and the cocoon when it emerges as the moth. Serrapeptase is an anti-inflammatory that has been used to treat conditions like arthritis and even to unblock coronary arteries.

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What is the difference between serrapeptase and nattokinase?

Serrapeptase is a proteolytic enzyme (breaks down proteins) that is naturally occurring in the gut of silk worm. It is produced by a bacterium living in the gut called Serratia E15, hence it’s name. Serrapeptase has a number of known actions in the body, including anti-inflammatory and it’s ability to break up non-living material.

Nattokinase on the other hand is an enzyme that is extracted from a purified Japanese food called natto. Natto has been eaten in Japan for many years and is made by the fermentation of soybeans by a bacterium called Bacillus natto (hence its name). Nattokinase is often used in alternative medicine to thin the blood and break up clots. It is also used as a substitute for aspirin therapy.

As always, consult your doctor before using any medicine, alternative, traditional or otherwise.

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Can You Buy Serrapeptase for Dogs?

Yes, the good news is that Good Health Naturally also feature Serrapeptase for dogs and other pets.  Their formula is called SerraPet.

This may help your dog (or other pet) with

  • Healthier Lungs
  • Healthier Joints
  • Healthy Tendons
  • Healthy Inflammation
  • Healthy Inflamed Tissue

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Where Can I Read Some Serrapeptase Testimonials?

Although there are a lot of testimonials spread around the web, the one website that seems to have a large collection of testimonials is the Original Serrapeptase site.  I should point out though that as with any supplement, sometimes something will work for one person and not another.  Testimonials are great, but don’t expect to get the same results as other people.

From a personal point of view, serrapeptase worked wonders for me on some scar tissue that was causing my problems in my neck (two herniated discs) leaving my right hand almost useless for several months.  Serrapeptase plus some treatment from a chiropractor seemed to fix the problem.  However, I would not expect everyone to have the same level of success I did. Every body is unique, and it’s also the other things a person does that helps a treatment work.

Posted in: Serrapeptase

What is Serrapeptase?

Serrapeptase has been called the “miracle enzyme” or the “super enzyme” due to its wide range of actions in human body and the fact that it’s got no reported side-effects. It’s been used for more than three decades throughout Europe and Asia for a variety of treatments and is seen as a natural alternative to anti-inflammatory drugs. It is widely used in clinical practice throughout Japan. There are some amazing stories about this enzyme that the one that caught my attention most was the story of Mike Tawse who was born with spastic diplegia (cerebral palsy).

Serrapeptase (also called Serra enzyme, Serratiopeptidase, Serratio peptidase, serrazyme, serra peptase, serrapeptidase, serra enzyme – and another called serraplus but this is a little different as you’ll see below) is a proteolytic enzyme (breaks down proteins) isolated from a bacteria called Serratia E15 which is found in the intestines of silk worm. In the silkworm this enzyme helps them off to dissolve the cocoon (which if you have ever seen one is hard as rock).

Cell studies have shown that serrapeptase has strong anti-inflammatory effects which has made it supplement that is often given to arthritis sufferers. It can digest non-living tissue including cysts and blood clots (as reported by the late Dr. Hans Alfred Nieper).

Dr. Hans Alfred Nieper

Dr. Nieper of Hanover, Germany was president of the German Society of Oncology (an oncologist specialises in cancer). In many ways Dr Nieper was a leading advocate in the use serrapeptase. He reported a number of benefits including the cleaning of coronary arteries of fibrous blockages in his coronary heart patients.

Dr. Nieper used serrapeptase in patients where there was severe narrowing of the carotid arteries. The patients often suffering from severe symptoms including intermittent blindness (amaurosis fugax). Ultrasound examination confirmed that patients had significantly improved blood flow through previously narrow blood vessels. The reported results were excellent, even “life-saving” though Dr Nieper did stress the need for further tests.

Dr. Nieper reported that is remarkable feature of serrapeptase is that unlike other biological enzymes, serrapeptase only affects non-living tissue. From the silkworm’s point of view that’s very important, because otherwise the enzyme would not only eat into the cocoon so that it could escape, but it would also destroy the moth. This feature of serrapeptase makes it very useful in keeping the arteries clean after an angioplasty operation (a balloon used to clear arterial blockages) or coronary bypass surgery.

What are the Health Benefits of Serrapeptase & How Serrapeptase Works

As with any supplement, you should consult your doctor before taking serrapeptase. When enteric coated serrapeptase is taken on an empty stomach, serrapeptase will pass through into the small intestines were it is absorbed into the bloodstream.

Once in the blood it passes throughout the body breaking down protein debris that can cause immune reactions leading to inflammation and swelling.

Serrapeptase is often taken to treat inflammatory bowel disease, arthritis, sinusitis and fibrocystic breast disease. Research suggests that it helps to break up fibrin – a protein mesh produced by the body in response to injury. Fibrin helps blood cells clot around an injury and develops into scar tissue. However, blood clots can also form in arteries, leading to heart attacks, strokes and the deep vein thrombosis we hear so much about on the TV these days. It serrapeptase can help reduce levels of access fibrin then perhaps it can help prevent dangerous blood clots forming.

Serrapeptase reduces the growth of bradykinins (compounds that bind to sites of inflammation) to help reduce swelling. It is therefore used to help reduce pain and inflammation in the following disorders:

  • Fibrocystic breast disease
  • Ear infections
  • Nose infections
  • Throat infections
  • Post surgical edema
  • Carpel tunnel syndrome
  • Chronic airway disease

Serrapeptase and Nasal Mucus

One of the side-effects I have noticed from taking serrapeptase myself is that my nose tends to run a little more. Serrapeptase reduces the elasticity and thickness of nasal mucus secretions as well as fluids that are produced around the site of an injury. Since mucus is thinned, serrapeptase may well help people suffering from diseases like cystic fibrosis, chronic bronchitis, bronchial asthma, pulmonary tuberculosis, emphysema and sinus issues etc.

By removing the inflammation and breaking down the dead tissue from many of these diseases, the enzyme can help restore healthier lung tissue function.

Published literature on Serrapeptase

Suggests that Serrapeptase was effective in:

  • Treating patients with chronic airway disease.
  • Reducing inflammation and pain after dental surgery.
  • Reducing levels of neutrophils in the blood which can help treat respiratory disorders.
  • Thinning sputum to help reduce the chance of mucus accumulation.
  • Reducing post-operative pain, inflammation and swelling.
  • Helpful in treating heart related conditions, like treating arterial plaque and reversing atherosclerosis to help protect patients against heart attacks and stroke.
  • Dissolve harmful substances that form plaque in the arterial walls like cellular waste, fat, fibre in, cholesterol and calcium.
  • Dr. Arnold Renshaw treated 700 patients with fibrositis, rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis and had excellent results, taking around two months to start showing signs of recovery. He also found serrapeptase was effective in patients with Still’s disease and Ankylosing Spondylitis.

Serrapeptase to treat Arthritis

Serrapeptase can be used to help treat both rheumatoid and osteoarthritis and it’s probably a lot safer than the medications typically prescribed which have steroids in them. Its reported that serrapeptase can help reduce inflammation and pain as well as potentially reducing the risks of thromboembolic complications, cartilage damage, muscle atrophy and swelling.

Serrapeptase side-effects?

The medical research available on serrapeptase suggests that there are very few side-effects associated with this enzyme. A few rare cases have reported possible allergic skin reactions. Some people may also get nausea or feel upset stomach sent serrapeptase needs to be taken on an empty stomach for it to be effective. It’s reported that serrapeptase is a natural blood thinner so this could cause problems with people that have blood clotting disorders. As always, never take any supplement without consulting your doctor first. This is even more important if you are taking prescription medication as well.serraenzyme

serraplusWhere to Get Serrapeptase

You can find enteric coated serrapeptase in a wide range of doses as well as with different outer coatings to help prevent stomach acid from breaking it down on its journey through into the small intestines. Most doses are expressed in units of I.U. with common doses ranging from 20,000 IU up to 80,000 IU, possibly higher.

The enteric coated Serrapeptase I buy is Serraplus+ 80,000IU Tablets (though you can also buy Serrapeptase at Amazon.com). This high dose formula provides 80,000IU enteric coated tablets with 50mg trace minerals to ensure better utilization of the enzymes, plus 350mg of MSM for Lungs, joints, skin, and connective tissue repair.

You can also get normal Serrapeptase without the MSM and trace minerals if you prefer.

 NOTE: Good Health Naturally also feature Serrapeptase for dogs and other pets.  Their formula is called SerraPet.


Serrapeptase References & Further Reading:

  1. Original Serrapeptase – Information on how it works, plus reviews from Serra Enzyme users.
  2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serratiopeptidase – Serratiopeptidase, from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  3. Mike Tawse – His Serrapeptase Adventure

About Andy

Andy writes for a number of health related sites but has always been fascinated by alternative medicine and home remedies. His deep interests in nature and the body's innate ability to heal itself (given the right condition) have lead him to a pivotal time in his life - and so, Holistic Home Fitness was born. While it's relatively new at the moment, Andy wants to build this site into a huge reference site for a more holistic approach to health and fitness.