Pre-Diabetes


Prediabetes is becoming an epidemic, but with diet and exercise, may be treatable before it develops into something more serious

Prediabetes (“impaired glucose tolerance”) is a health condition with no symptoms.  It is called “pre” diabetes, because it is a “warning stage” in the development of full type 2 diabetes.  The disease is characterised as blood sugar levels that are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes.  Fasting levels of blood glucose between 100 and 126 mg/dl are diagnosed as prediabetes.  Over 126mg and it is diagnosed as diabetes.

Early diagnosis is vital if you are to treat it successfully, because developing type 2 diabetes if you suffer from prediabetes is not inevitable.  If you are diagnosed with prediabetes, you should do everything in your power to reverse the condition with diet and exercise (your doctor will give you a plan of action).  If you ignore it, you could develop the more serious type 2 diabetes as well as associated complications like cardiovascular disease and eye and kidney problems.

Treatment of pre-diabetes

If you think you have the condition, consult your doctor.  They can give you a diagnosis and provide you with the steps you need to take to try to reverse the problem.  These steps may include:

  • Using a blood glucose meter to check your blood sugar levels during the day.
  • Eat a healthy, wholesome, balanced diet with more fresh vegetables and salads.
  • Get active and do some physical exercise.
  • Eat carbs with a lower glycemic index.
  • Eat more fiber.
  • Avoid processed carbs.

Who is most at risk of prediabetes?

  • People with a family history of type 2 diabetes.
  • Women who have had gestational diabetes.
  • Women suffering with polycystic ovary syndrome.
  • Overweight and obese people.
  • Those who do little or no exercise.
  • Sufferers of high cholesterol, or high blood pressure.
  • Older people are more likely to develop prediabetes.

If you fall into any of these groups, you should consider a test.  This test usually  involves monitoring blood glucose levels for a few hours after drinking a glucose drink.


About Andy

Andy writes for a number of health related sites but has always been fascinated by alternative medicine and home remedies. His deep interests in nature and the body's innate ability to heal itself (given the right condition) have lead him to a pivotal time in his life - and so, Holistic Home Fitness was born. While it's relatively new at the moment, Andy wants to build this site into a huge reference site for a more holistic approach to health and fitness.